8.1.2018

ORIGINAL ARTICLE

Effect of preoperative gabapentin and acetaminophen on opioid consumption in video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery: a retrospective study

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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.21454/rjaic.7518.251.gab

Robert Qiu1, Albert C. Perrino, Jr1,2, Holly Zurich1, Nitin Sukumar1, Feng Dai1, Wanda Popescu1,2

1 Department of Anesthesiology, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA
2 Veterans Administration Connecticut Healthcare System, West Haven, CT, USA

Abstract
Background: Patients undergoing video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) are particularly vulnerable to opioid-induced sedation and hypoventilation. Accordingly, reducing opioid consumption in these patients is a primary goal of multimodal analgesic regimens. Although administration of preoperative gabapentin and acetaminophen has been shown to decrease postoperative opioid consumption in other surgeries, this approach has not been studied in VATS lobectomy. Our objective was to examine the impact
of the addition of preoperative gabapentin and acetaminophen to a VATS lobectomy multimodal analgesic plan on postoperative opioid consumption, nausea/vomiting, and sedation.
Methods: With IRB approval, we performed a retrospective chart review of patients who underwent VATS lobectomy at a single center between 2015 and 2016 to identify those that received preoperative gabapentin and acetaminophen and those that received neither. Opioid consumption in the first 24 hours postoperatively was converted to oral morphine equivalents (OMEQs). Postoperative sedation was evaluated using Aldrete scores and the percentage of patients requiring antiemetics in the first 24 hours was also examined.
Results: There were 133 patients who were opioid naive: 31 received preoperative gabapentin and acetaminophen and 102 received neither. Median 24 hour postoperative opioid consumption was lower but not statistically significant in the gabapentin and acetaminophen group vs. neither (36 mg vs. 45 mg, p = 0.08). Notably, there was a change in the distribution of opioid consumption, with no patients in the gabapentin
and acetaminophen group requiring more than 200 mg OMEQ in the first 24 hours postoperatively. No significant difference in postoperative nausea/vomiting or sedation was observed.
Conclusions: The addition of preoperative gabapentin and acetaminophen to a VATS lobectomy multimodal analgesic regimen reduces the incidence of high dose postoperative opioid consumption without observed negative side effects.
Keywords: acute pain, thoracic surgical procedures, postoperative pain, acetaminophen, gabapentin